Thursday, October 26, 2006

CRITTER DAY THURSDAYS -- Daddy Long Legs on a Tree Stump


20 Comments:

Blogger micki said...

Daddy Long Legs 1
Camera - Minolta Maxxum 7000
Film - Fuji HQ ISO 200
Shutter Speed - 0.7 seconds
Aperture Setting - f-13 Aperture Mode
Lens - Sigma 105mm macro/portrait lens
13mm, 21mm, and 31mm extension tubes
Collapsible reflector, gold side
Scanning Method - My scan from my cheap little hp officejet 5510v all-in-one copy/scanner/faxer/printer
Cropped out the bottom half of the image. It was just out of focus tree stump.

Daddy Long Legs 2
Camera - Minolta Maxxum 7000
Film - Fuji HQ ISO 200
Shutter Speed - 3 seconds
Aperture Setting - f-22 Aperture Mode
Lens - Sigma 105mm macro/portrait lens
13mm, 21mm, and 31mm extension tubes
Collapsible reflector, gold side
Scanning Method - My scan from my cheap little hp officejet 5510v all-in-one copy/scanner/faxer/printer


Many thanks to Samarth for allowing me to put the beautiful poem he wrote yesterday under the photo I posted. He is such a talented young man in so many ways.

Every previous summer since we’ve lived here there have been daddy long legs all over the house, hundred of them. I used to clean the outside of the windows once a week (I’ve got better things to do now) and they daddies would be everywhere, dropping on me and scurrying out of my way. This year I could barely find a one. When I did, they were hidden away in a shadowy place, and without a macroflash (it’s on its way), I couldn’t get any good shots in. Finally, a couple of weeks ago, I found a daddy long legs sleeping in the last of the sunlight of the afternoon. We lose the sunlight in the yard about two hours before sunset because of all the trees surrounding us. By the time I got everything set up to take the shots, I had to use a reflector to get light on this fella. He did, good, though; keeping real still for my long exposures. I stopped down as much as I dared to go without risking his moving during the exposures. He never moved to a spot where I could get him face to lens, but I never would’ve imagined the fierce-looking physical characteristics that showed up in these shots. And don’t his legs look like tree twigs? The top photo is a little soft, but it was the only shot of an eye not covered in sand.

10:19 AM  
Anonymous Laurie said...

Ewwww....and Oooooh!

This is wonderful shot of an ugly critter.

12:25 PM  
Anonymous Doris said...

I thought they were some sort of sea creature tell I read what they were and then it was OH DUH LOL

12:45 PM  
Blogger PhotoSam said...

We had a very brief period of daddy long legs, really not many of them....the little guy looks seriously mean...7.75/10

1:26 PM  
Blogger photowannabe said...

I always thought Daddy Long Legs were so harmless and passive. This one looks downright mean. Great capture.

1:49 PM  
Blogger Alfred said...

oh, man - I thought was something I might expect to find in my bed...
Great shot!

2:42 PM  
Anonymous Still said...

What a strange creature! Iknow the name but I've never see that! Thanks for the discovery

5:03 PM  
Anonymous Paul said...

Lovely, Micki. As a kid, I used to play with them all of the time. You had to be really careful with them because their legs detach so easily, but I'm sure that you know that. You seem very familiar with the outdoors. :-)

8:48 PM  
Blogger PlasticTV said...

Positively disgusting. :p But what effort there trying to catch a picture.

9:18 PM  
Anonymous outdoorexposure said...

look like someone stick the needles on them...nice closed up shot:-)

10:56 PM  
Anonymous joel said...

Have never really taken the opportunity to study these things up close. I find it really odd since I have a natural draw to study the insect world. The spider looks like a little more alien than I thought it would.

I have found a good method for photographing small moving insects is to place them on a flat surface, and then put a jar open side down over them. Spiders will typicaly struggle for about 30 seconds with the jar and then settle down. Now since the jar is transparent you can get fairly close to the exposure settings and also the right focus. Now with one hand on your camera and shutter release and the other on the jar. Very gently lift the jar being careful to not disturb your critter, and shoot away. They will usually stay still for a couple of seconds or longer.

11:57 PM  
Blogger Dave MacIntyre said...

WOW!!!! Alien 5!

1:00 AM  
Blogger Chris Fry said...

He really does look like an alien and so different to the daddy long legs we get in Melbourne, and Australia I'm sure. Our critters have thin small bodies with long spindly legs. Then again, I haven't "macro'd" one so maybe ours do look like this. I'll have to get one and give it a try ... like Joel has suggested. Ahhhh, I feel a project coming on.

1:39 AM  
Anonymous Ricardo said...

It enchants that macro to me, mainly the colors. Greetings!

4:06 AM  
Anonymous david said...

it's not we call a DLL over here, this is a far more scary looking beastie!!

6:51 AM  
Blogger Naturegirl said...

I like the respect you give these creatures of nature and it shows that you are taking in the world around you
to the tiniest detail! Looking down can be very rewarding!

8:06 AM  
Anonymous AG said...

Incredible shots and most interesting Comments. Like said, our UK-DLL differ from this – or, I think they do. Another research program goes on the list!

8:43 AM  
Blogger frame of mind said...

Wicked, wicked cool shots here - you'll be unstoppable once that new flash rig arrives!

8:29 AM  
Anonymous johnz said...

man, you see this daddy looking at you, he or she is thinking "oh my god, this must be the creature of the legends that brought other creatures into being that pulled off the legs of my ancestors..."

11:26 PM  
Anonymous Ho Kian Kheong said...

These are harvestmen, not daddy long legs

4:35 PM  

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